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>> for more information on tvs recent visit to santa fe, new mexico another city visited by her local content vehicle, visit c-span.org/local content. ..a?xx i first came to washington, d.c. in 2000 as a congressional correspondent for the associated press. after spending several years in colombia south carolina and albany new york. now, i am originally from mississippi, the son of two public school teachers come in and being from mississippi, the one thing my parents made sure that i knew was my history. it was almost a state requirement in mississippi to know where you came from. so, when i left mississippi to go to south carolina, i had this desire to history and i studied the history of south carolina. i didn't the same thing when i went to upstate new york. i got involved in learning the african-american history of upstate new york which, by the way, is very vibrant. a lot of the underground railroads ended in upstate new york city have a very vibrant african-american community and history up there. but when i left albany new york to come to washington, d.c., and i knew i
. ♪ >> the city itself is try cultural. we both more authors and poets than most communities. >> welcome to santa fe on booktv. with the help of comcast cable partners for the next 90 minutes we will explore the literary scene and history of new mexico and its capital, a city resting at an altitude of almost 7,000 feet whose name means hope and faith in spanish. we will travel in and around this town of 80,000 to meet with local lawyers to learn about the unique cultures, personalities and history of the city and state that dates back 400 years to the times of colonization attempts by the spanish. all this and more as booktv and our comcast cable partners take you to santa fe. >> we're here in the palace press. james mcgrath morris and these are early printing presses. it seemed like a perk picked -- perfect place to talk about the man revolutionized american newspapers. webmac first started working on a boat people would react with recognition when i said i was writing about joseph pulitzer the clear from their expressions they knew the name but nothing about his life because pulitzer shares his
they reported their experiences and their impressions of santa fe combat the old royal city. and many of them could not believe that a royal city had houses made of mud. there was a little bit of culture shock. others took the exotic feel of the place in the beautiful mountain setting right away and that is true today. santa fe inspires strong emotions. for example a man named chris wilson who is an architectural historian at the university of new mexico wrote a book not too long ago called the myth of santa fe in which he documents the evolution of santa fe's style and quiet the civic fathers decided that we needed to see the look of an earlier time to attract tourism and why he feels that is not necessarily an advantage for santa fe's culture and certainly not to advance authentic indigenous architecture. a famous novel was written in the latter part of the 19th century that is still in print today. it has nothing at all to do with new mexico. it was an accident of chance that the author was general lou wallace who wrote ben-hur, a tale of the christ. the last three chapters were written in
, new mexico and other cities local content vehicles. go to c-span.org/local content. >> up next, someone talks about dinners hosted by winston churchill during and after world war ii, which is used to persuade world were leaders on various matters. it's about 45 minutes. >> good evening. thank you for coming. i'm delighted to see you here to talk about my new book, "dinner with churchill: policy-making at the dinner table." since i book is about the importance of dinner, i will be brief. i just want to whet your appetite so that go buy my book. those try another sentence. i have lived with winston churchill for four years and it was wonderful, even though that took place in the frigid archives at churchill college. i'm often asked ray got the idea for another book on churchill to ask the thousands are to britain. when i read about this fascinating man and his important accomplishments were achieved at dinners. sometimes that lunch is. as i began to wonder why that was so come away most of the deal struck as the famous international conferences held during world war ii were made
with the internet. but zero well, i can book a ticket now and every day we exclaim cover city eight years getting is quickly and easily are a commonplace things that i don't think it's a cheap ato and evaluating it. i'm not so sure of americans remember burkett was a rockefeller or carnegie, yet yet we drive across bridges with steel. that's a carnegie kids. we used cars powered that will, it will rockefeller built them is the financial system and consuming is built on a system developed and created by people at pulitzer. pulitzer came to the united states and unearthing the soldiers and they went to europe and he didn't really see any action. like many veterans after the war he was on foot, often afterwards hard to integrate people into the economy. he ends up in st. louis greek becomes befriended by a major who becomes a senator from missouri this newspaper publisher. pulitzer enters the road. within five years of his dreamy night state companies elected state legislature to stare. it's that kind of speed of immigration 19th century when people would come in. to become successful in a really sh
and -- cities visited by local custom vehicles go to c-span.org / local content. >> you're watching book tv on c-span2. here is our prime-time lineup for tonight. visit c-span.org for more on this weekend's television schedule. >> international financial diplomat william rhodes talks about the current economic and financial challenges facing the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next on book tv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it is great to be back. we enjoyed our relationship that way. tokyo has been the headquarters of our asia-pacific operations for 25 years now. we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot of different ways. one of my colleagues who is with me, doug peterson who just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, pers
of the economy. david grew up in new york outside of new york city and his father was a psychiatrist. he went to harvard college and then got a master's and became an investment banker doing mortgage finance at morgan stanley lehman brothers where he had a front-row seat to fannie and freddie which is something we might hear more from him in the q&a. then he got in television and he's the ceo of the game show network and came very late in life because of his tragedy. he wrote a cover story in atlanta magazine called how health care killed his father, killed my father, and then turned that into a book. it's an incredibly compelling book that i would encourage all of you to buy. there's copies outside. i am constructive to say the next season of american bible challenge, the highest rated show is coming on a few weeks. the game show network can feel like we are not stealing its ceo and we are giving them a plug, too. please join me in welcoming david. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sure everyone here reads your blog but it is a thrill. thank you for that and for the introduction today. and everyb
purchased in its international school in new york city were none of the students are native english speakers. ms. houser tells the story of a student who escaped nepal and attended the international high school. >> so many advocates have amazing stories and the one i wanted to read is about a tibetan boy who left tibet as a little boy, escaped by hiding in a suitcase to travel to the border of nepal and so he and i worked pretty hard on his story to get all the facts straight. the man said motioning at a small suitcase on the ground. it was the fall of 2003, two years before a new one would arrive in international and they're standing on a street. he looked at the man in back of the suitcase. the man was his father's friend, a farmer with a faith filled with worry. black nylon the plastic handlebar, rubber wheels. noong had never touched a suitcase before and inspected it closely. there was chinese flattering on it he could not read. the main compartment was only about two by three feet, the size of a child's coffin. noong was small for 11, but he wasn't that small. he got the firmware must
, and handed over to them. that senior lyndon johnson met in atlantic city, in the chapter i have here, to me it's amazing this is not more news. i have written in detail as i can, he had a nervous breakdown because he's trying to do little delegates from mississippi, and to see all the regular white democrats from mississippi who would publicly pledge to vote for goldwater, the democratic delegates said they would vote for goldwater, and most of them started switching party instantly but he wanted to defeat them anyway. and the mississippi freedom democrats, they walked out because they didn't think it was fair. and karl sanders and one of the conversations you can hear, and john connally, called lyndon johnson and told them if you would even let those two symbolic, the whole south will walk out of this convention because you will be turning the democratic party over to the negro, and letting martin luther king decide who can be a democrat. and johnson almost has a breakdown on the phone there, and basically went to bed for several days and said i'm going to quit. i can't handle this. i'm tr
by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of debt cry cease and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot in what we needed to be able to do. so we were able to convince him, and so now i'm not talking to you as his friend, i'm talking to you as his publisher. [laughter] and we had this decision, you know, we were going to do this book, and we kid. and we did. now, the ink wasn't even dry on this book when henry kissinger came out and sai
segregated. my dear mayor said that as in as dr. king of the civil rights bill fast, the city and led to build a sports stadium on land it did not own this money to not have for a team it had not located. it cut the milwaukee brewers to come here and become the first professional sports team in the south. dr. king's of the one the term the rated themselves in segregation because of was the right, the core of the constitution, it would liberate the white south. psychologically, economically, and so many of their ways. the question that i want to pose to you is the same question that drove me to say, the second reason, let's do this, try to make decillion to to get people to address the question, why is there such a tremendous disconnect between the broad liberation that has been loosed across the land and relatively low cost historically. people suffered, and many more recently. a lot of violence, and a lot of psychic damage. but for the amount of social change produced it was remarkably civilized. it blesses lots of lots of of the people, and yet in our public discourse today we still
in getting things done? >> well, walter was an internationalist first class. the expanded the city banks in italy over -- is a great friend of japan. used to go to japan regularly, and i think he, along with paul volcker on the public sector side, where major mentors of mind. and so i think it's fair to say, and you've seen this, that walter was the greatest thinker of his age. and that's what citi is going back to i think at this point in time. we have a lot of present citi bankers, former citibank offers who i know will agree with me. but as far as, you, working with walter come easily got me involved in all of this, and john reed later on, were both i think significant world financial leaders. as far as having talked to a lot of people, i think meeting monday look, having dealt with a number of cases, spend our in 1980 with ago castro. he wanted my advice on how to restructure the cuban debt. and i can speak to you about that because we nationalize in cuba, one of the first things we did was nationalize the foreign banks. then he walks on our resource. we're kind of even here. certain
and got a new law that compelled more cities than to join posses that were hunting people accused of being a runaway slaves who had allegedly escaped into the free states. most of all, the champions of slavery sought ways to detain a control diet almost continuously exercised over the federal government since the american revolution and to prevent above all, prevent others from using the federal government in ways that might have the slaveowner sensuous. in doing this, by the way, they were really aided by a cause of the constitution, the so-called three fifths clause that gave southern whites have your representation in the house of representatives and the room numbers otherwise would have warranted. southerners also saw it this representation in congress and a steadily increasing the number of slave states in the union. soil moisture in the 1840s the davises hursley demanded and lustily cheered both the annexation of texas and war with mexico. which incidentally removed and transferred to the united states only behalf of the national terrain of mexico. southerners cheered this war in hop
, and we had some leftovers. those leftovers went to the city, extra stock. it then went as a part of a sister or city program with a local gentleman down to mexico and went to children in mexico. so there you have the literary arts, the performing arts, the educational value and the city cultural outreach all in one volume. form an allegiance to it. if you don't like what they carry, tell them. a lot of what we order comes from suggestions from our customers. i wish you had this book, i wish you had that book. and we'll get it for them. and very often we'll get another copy for the store, and very often that will sell brick quickly. so go to your local store whatever you're trying to buy. see what they have, talk to the people. these are your maybe the neighbors. -- these are your neighbors. >> for more information on booktv's recent visit to santa fe, new mexico, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >>> and now, general stanley mcchrystal discusses his memoir, "my share of the task." in the book the former commander of u.s. forces in afghanistan recounts the major turning points in his
is another theme. of course this is a political town. this is the capitol city and has been the seat of government since the founding 403 years ago. and so the exercise of political power and the development of public policy is another theme. the history of santa fe is distinctive. for one thing, santa fe became a u.s. territory in 1848. and it was a territory for a very long time. the country and washington were reluctant to make santa fe a state. that eventually happened in 1912. new mexico existed as a territory for so long, in someso many ways doesn't seem to fit the rest of the country. and in fact, santa fe proudly, for a long, long time, has described itself as the city different. santa fe was -- and new mexico were explored by the spanish, coming from the south to the north. not from anglos coming from the east to the west. that's one difference. this community that's closely tied to the catholic church, priests accompanied spanish settlers on their way north and establishment of the church and establishment of the community of santa fe are inseparable. of course, this is-was
and shipped to mexico. he is stuck city decides i will negotiate the end of the war in the treaty is sent back to president polk he is outraged and ejected tailored misstate -- administration to compensate for expensive but president polk cannot send the treaty to the senate after he publicly said the terms and it is everything he asked for initially before he changed his mind to get the whole thing. lincoln and his colleagues very, very successful. with the hands on the omnibus postal will and benefits those in his district, he is a player with the issues of "war and peace." >> you have shared a desk with some cool characters. had to interact with these guys? what is a process for finding the next turn in finding the next turn in your narrative? >> it was great fun to research. had to add value to lincoln's story it is only the third book of him in congress in history there are so many books so i will look at letters of his colleagues from the 30th congress most people have not even looked sue their letters. one example of a house mate from abolition house his papers are in harrisburg pennsyl
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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